The Cost to Install a Resin Driveway

All you need to know about installing a resin driveway including costs of materials, labour and time frames.

Cost to install resin driveway

What the job entails

Resin based driveway surfacing is comparatively new to the UK but gaining in popularity thanks to significant advances in polymer and epoxy resins in recent years. To make a resin driveway, essentially decorative gravel is bonded to an existing solid surface by means of a transparent or a coloured resin. These aggregate driveways are fairly resistant to weeds and moss, as well as oil leaks, plus they do not fade over time when exposed to UV light and are relatively low maintenance compared to other driveway types. Resin bonded driveways are a cost effective way of improving the appearance your driveway, as it can be applied over existing tarmac, which is much cheaper than having to remove the old drive first. In addition, they can look amazing with a huge variety of colours on offer to match your property and the surroundings. Resin driveways are also extremely durable thanks to a top sealed layer which is resistant to extreme weathers and heavy vehicles. They also remain colour fast over many years and are porous which means they are environmentally friendly and no more puddles on your drive!

Resin bonded surfaces are usually laid over the top of an existing tarmac or concrete driveway, greatly reducing the cost due to no excavation being required. Though the edges can still be excavated and a block edge can be installed allowing the resin mixture to be applied to the right depth. But installing on top of block paving is risky due to the possible movement of the paving blocks underneath the resin surface which could leave an uneven finish and even cause the resin surface to crack. If you have block paving you will find that most installers will offer you a cheaper price to overlay over the current surface, but this may not include a guarantee! Usually, they will offer a second price which will include removing the existing block paving and laying a new tarmac sub-base before the resin surface is installed. This will obviously cost a lot more due to the extra labour but is a much better job and you’ll usually get a firm guarantee on the driveway.

Another option is to use a grid system which is cheaper than a more solid sub-base such as tarmac or concrete. This involves laying a metal grid down as a base for the resin. But the preferred bases, in general, are either bit-mac or concrete, as they are whole, single slabs in terms of pavement with few if any joints (aka monolithic). Any surface made from discrete units with joints, will not be suitable as the base for a resin-based driveway.

Resin bonded surfaces are usually laid over the top of an existing tarmac or concrete driveway, greatly reducing the cost due to no excavation being required. Though the edges can still be excavated and a block edge can be installed allowing the resin mixture to be applied to the right depth. But installing on top of block paving is risky due to the possible movement of the paving blocks underneath the resin surface which could leave an uneven finish and even cause the resin surface to crack.

If you have block paving you will find that most installers will offer you a cheaper price to overlay over the current surface, but this may not include a guarantee! Usually, they will offer a second price which will include removing the existing block paving and laying a new tarmac sub-base before the resin surface is installed. This will obviously cost a lot more due to the extra labour but is a much better job and you’ll usually get a firm guarantee on the driveway. Another option is to use a grid system which is cheaper than a more solid sub-base such as tarmac or concrete. This involves laying a metal grid down as a base for the resin. But the preferred bases, in general, are either bit-mac or concrete, as they are whole, single slabs in terms of pavement with few if any joints (aka monolithic). Any surface made from discrete units with joints, will not be suitable as the base for a resin-based driveway.

While having the driveway upgraded, you may also want to consider any other hard landscaping work that may need doing on garden paths or your patio.

The main problems with resin driveways most often occur when they are installed onto block paving. This is really cheap but also very risky due to the possible movement of the paving blocks underneath the surface. If you ever see a resin drive with an uneven surface, this is almost always caused by not laying on top of a proper sub-base. This is, of course, a false economy as the driveway looks awful and will likely need redoing at some point so will cost even more in the long run! Especially when you consider that often more resin is used on block paving surfaces to try and get an even finish, then all this extra resin, plus the block paving, will need to be removed.

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The Cost to Install a Resin Driveway

To provide accurate pricing information we have contacted local and national companies, plus have used various online quotation tools. The figures provided should give a good rough idea of the costs involved if you are considering laying resin for your driveway, but of course you will need to gather more in-depth quotes from tradespeople and local companies to get an exact price for your requirements.

The average material cost for a resin driveway will firstly depend on the size of your driveway and what type of stones are used. From our research the cost of materials can vary from £40-£70 per square metre for all materials.

The average driveway specialist will usually charge around £150-£200 per day. Driveway specialists will often work in a group of 2-3 to complete the job and ensure the job is done as smoothly as possible. The overall labour price will be factored into the overall price quoted.

Below are some estimated costs of hiring a driveway specialist to install a resin driveway:

Driveway Size Avg. Cost Duration
1 car (20 sq m) £2000-£2500 3-5 days
2 cars (40 sq m) £3000-£3500 1-2 weeks
4 cars (80 sq m) £5500-£6000 2-3 weeks


Cost Breakdown

Individual costs to install a double-width (2 car) Resin Driveway (40 sq m) - Total Cost: £3,500

50%

Materials
£1750

40%

Tradesmen
£1400

10%

Waste Removal
£350

FAQ's

In the vast majority of cases, no. You do not need planning permission to install a drive made from a permeable material such as a resin based driveway. However, different councils have different rules so you should always contact your local council and double check before commencing any works.
Until relatively recently, the cost was a major factor as resin drives were seriously expensive! But this is much less of a problem today as over the last few years the market has benefited from better technology and certain economies of scale. In addition, there is still a general lack of customer awareness when it comes to resin-based driveway surfacing - though it is catching on!
The most important difference between resin bound and resin bonded driveway surfacing systems is that one is permeable, and the other is not. Resin bound driveways have a surface that is smooth and porous. Whereas resin bonded surfaces have a rough surface that is not porous.
Resin bound surfacing is best laid on either a concrete or a permeable asphalt surface.
There are over 50 different resin bound aggregate colours and aggregates available, so you can have virtually any colour scheme or design you choose.
A new base is always preferable for a professional job that will last.
No, resin bound surfacing should not be laid over any type of surface with multiple joints that will allow movement over time, as this will potentially cause the surfacing to prematurely crack or be uneven.
Resin bound surfacing has cavitation within the mixture so is permeable and water will run through the surface and back into the ground. So water freezing does not cause problems. During extreme heat resin bound surfaces actually remain cooler than asphalt or concrete, again thanks to the cavitation which allows air to circulate through it keeping temperatures down.