The Cost to Replace an Entire Bathroom Suite

All you need to know about replacing an entire bathroom suite including material & labour costs and how long the job should take to complete.

Bathroom Suite Cost

What the job entails

Welcome to our bathroom price guide article, how much does it typically cost to rip out an old bathroom and install a new bathroom suite? We have been in touch with bathroom installers all over the UK and asked them to provide prices for a typical bathroom in a standard 3-bedroom semi-detached house. The work they quoted for was to remove the old bathroom suite along with any floor and wall tiles, then to supply and fit new wall plasterboard and floor ply board.

Supply and fit new 3-piece bathroom suite including all the plumbing, to supply and fit floor and walls tiles, add new ceiling light, cord switch, taps and wall vanity mirror. That is for the basic job, which also includes having all electrical work signed off by qualified Part P electrician and the removal and disposal of all waste. But there are of course various additional extras which can be specified, but they will obviously increase the price.

Popular additional features include heated vertical towel rail instead of radiator, underfloor heating, adding a bidet, installing a shower cubicle or a wet room walk in shower instead of an over bath screen, installing an extractor fan, and premium wall tiles. A luxury bathroom suite will also bump up the cost as the prices mentioned assume mid-range suites from plumbers’ merchants or DIY superstores. The cost of the jobs will also vary depending on whether you are simply replacing items in the same place, or redesigning the bathroom and moving toilets, sinks and baths into different positions.

You can save money by only having the walls partially tiled or even tiling over the existing tiles, but this is not recommended. Budget bathroom suites and tiles can also save a lot of money but most look and feel cheap. Choosing a bathroom fitter who does not charge VAT because he is trading below the VAT threshold, is however a great way to save money as VAT is currently 20%. Another price factor worth mentioning is location, plumbers and bathroom fitters charge a lot more in London and the surrounding areas to reflect the higher cost of living. If the plumbing and pipework in the bathroom is damaged or very old it may also need replacing, which will increase the cost of the job. Choosing small fiddly bathroom tiles could also increase costs as they take much longer to fit.

If buying the bathroom suite yourself, don’t be afraid to negotiate in stores, the DIY industry is subject to seasonal trends and are suffering from the credit crunch just like the rest of us. If you are in the market for a complete new bathroom and have the money to pay for it! Then you are a customer that will be in high demand. Always make it clear to sales staff that you are a serious buyer but you are also looking around comparing prices so you want the very best deal available.

Don’t be pressured into buying on the spot, get a written quote including everything you need and come back once you have compared with other prices. That being said, the tradesman fitting the bathroom suite will have access to trade prices, so check with them if they can get the suite you need even cheaper. In the same vein, when bargaining for the suite, ask if the company also fit the bathrooms they sell, if so, get an installation price and compare to local fitters.

Remember that the most expensive part of a new bathroom is usually the labour cost, so get several quotes before you commit yourself but make sure you are comparing on a "like for like" basis. If there is little difference in the prices, it makes sense to go with a company that will both supply and fit the bathroom suite as this makes life much easier. Plus, if anything goes wrong, there will be no merry go round of the suppliers blaming the fitters for the mistake and vice versa!

If you are intending to stay in your current home for some time, then choose a bathroom that reflects your needs. However, if you might move on in the near future, then a neutral or classic bathroom suite – especially in white – will usually be the most appealing and sensible in the long run.

Cost to Supply & Fit an Entire Bathroom Suite

The average cost to replace an entire bathroom suite is typically in the range of £3000 to £5000 but can be as high as £10,000 for top of the range suites for large bathrooms. The price will also vary depending on your location and who you get to do the job; larger companies tend to charge more than single tradesmen.

A bathroom specialist will often charge around £150-£200 a day in labour costs and for a full bathroom installation, it usually takes around 7-10 days to complete the work, but again, this will depend on the size of the bathroom, the type of materials to be fitted and any extra pipework that's required.

Below are some estimated costs of replacing a full bathroom suite and associated jobs:

Description Materials Cost Labour Cost Duration
Remove Old Suite & Tiles £0 £200 4-8 hours
Prep Walls, Floor & Ceiling £100 £100 2-4 hours
Toilet, Sink and Bath incl. taps £400 £600 2-3 days
Toilet, Sink and Shower incl. taps £600 £600 2-3 days
Toilet, Sink, Shower and Bath incl. taps £800 £650 2-3 days
Wall and Floor Tiling £500 £400 1-2 days
Mirror, Light & Radiator £200 £100 3-4 hours


Cost Breakdown

Individual costs for hiring a bathroom specialist to replace an entire bathroom suite including prep work, wall and floor tiling, and installing a mirror, light and heated hand rail - Total Cost: £3500

45%

Materials
£1575

50%

Tradesmen
£1750

5%

Waste Removal
£175

FAQ's

Using average prices the typical cost would be around £3200-£3700. That price includes supply and fitting of 3-piece suite including shower screen, bath and sink taps, wall and floor tiles (plus all grout/adhesive), decent spec shower unit, wall mirror and light, towel rail, ceiling light and cord switch, paint, pipework, electrical parts, plasterboard and plywood, and waste disposal.

The total cost for materials would be around £1500 in this example for mid-range bathroom suite and tiles. So if doing the job yourself, it would cost £1500 plus electricians bill for shower electrics and signing off on Part P building regulations. But remember these prices are just averages, the actual costs vary substantially between companies and you could easily end up spending over £10,000 on a new bathroom if you get carried away with the various features and optional extras!

On the other hand, if budget B&Q hardware and basic bathroom suite is more your cup of tea, you could have a new bathroom for less than £2000 if you live outside of London and don’t mind only half tiling walls and getting just the very bare essentials.
A rough timescale for the work above would be around 7 to 9 days, with the wall preparation and tiling being the one aspect of the job that took the longest. The tiling work is assuming tiling onto good walls, if the walls are in really bad condition with lots of plasterwork repairs required, then this extra preparation work will increase the time taken and therefore the cost.